Biyi Bandele

Contributor: Nisha Obano

Biyi Bandele-Thomas is a novelist, playwright and poet. He was born in 1967 into a Yoruba family living in the largely Hausa community in Kafanchan, northern Nigeria. His mother was an avid storyteller, and Biyi was a keen reader from an early age and  a regular user of the local library in his hometown. But it was his father, a veteran of the Burma Campaign during World War II, who was a major influence in Bandele’s literary life, introducing his son to the works of Wole Soyinka and Chinua Achebe, along with a range of other international classics. It was on the television bought by his father that Bandele had his first encounter with ‘theatre’ when he saw John Osborne’s Look Back in Anger.

At eighteen, after several wayward years as a hustler, Bandele left Kafanchan for Lagos and then went on to Ife Ife to study drama at Obafemi Awolowo University. In 1989 he won the International Student Playscript Competition for ‘Rain’ and in 1990 received the British Council Lagos Award for an unpublished collection of poems. Later that year he left for London on a scholarship (part of the International Student Playscript award). Although the scholarship was to last for only one year, Bandele stayed on in London, where he has lived since then.

Bandele’s first published novel, The Man Who Came in from the Back of Beyond, which he had began writing as a schoolboy, appeared in 1991. His second book, The Sympathetic Undertaker and Other Dreams, a satirical narrative featuring the fictional character, President Platini Babagee of Zowabi, loosely based on the former Nigerian president Ibrahim Babangida, came out the same year and was later reissued in Heinemann’s African Writers Series in 1993. He also wrote a number of plays: Marching for Fausa (1993), which was performed at the Royal Court Theatre in London; Resurrections in the Season of the Longest Drought (1994); and Two Horsemen (1994), which was selected as Best New Play at the London New Plays Festival the same year.

While Bandele was the Arts Council Resident dramatist with Talawa Theatre Company at the Cochrane Theatre in London (1993-1994), he was also making inroads into television with two productions: Not Even God is Wise Enough, directed by Danny Boyle and aired in 1993; and the BBC production of Bad Boy Blues starring Clive Owen and Burt Caesar in 1994. He then went on to become Writer in Residence at the Royal National Theatre Studio in 1995. After adapting Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart for the stage in 1997, Bandele’s stage adaptation of Aphra Behn’s Oronooko was performed by the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) in 1999. Featuring an all-black cast, the play was later awarded an EMMA in 2000. Bandele continued working with the RSC on another adaptation, this time of his own novel The Street, published the same year as Oroonoko, which became Brixton Stories, one of a series of plays commissioned for the RSC’s ‘Other Eden’ project. This coincided with a performance of Bandele’s Happy Birthday, Mr Deka D specially commissioned by the Told by an Idiot Company which premiered in Liverpool in 1999. Between 2000 and 2002, Bandele was the Judith E Wilson Fellow at Churchill College, Cambridge. He also acted as Royal Literary Fund Resident Playwright at the Bush Theatre, London, from 2002-2003.

Having been named one of Africa’s most promising artists by the Independent in 2006, 2007 saw the publication of his internationally and critically acclaimed novel, Burma Boy. Also known in the United States as The King’s Rifle, the novel is the largely untold story of African soldiers fighting for the British during the Second World War and has been translated into almost twenty languages. Since 2007 Bandele has been concentrating on literature and film. He is now working on a film adaptation of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s novel Half of A Yellow Sun, due for release in 2013.

Material by Biyi Bandele

Novels, Story Collections and Plays by Biyi Bandele

Brixton Stories/Happy Birthday, Mister Deka D: Two Plays. London: Methuen Drama, 2001.

Burma Boy. London: Jonathan Cape, 2007.

Death Catches the Hunter/Me and the Boys. Oxford: Amber Lane Press, 1995.
The Man Who Came In From the Back of Beyond. Oxford: Heinemann, 1991.
Marching for Fausa. Oxford: Amber Lane Press, 1993.
Adapt. Oroonoko. By Aphra Behn. Oxford: Amber Lane Press, 1999.
Resurrections in the Season of the Longest Drought. Oxford: Amber Lane Press, 1994.
The Street. London: Picador, 2000.
The Sympathetic Undertaker and Other Dreams. London: Bellew, 1991.
Two Horsemen. Oxford: Amber Lane Press, 1994.

 

Television Scripts and Radio Plays by Biyi Bandele

Bad Boy Blues. Dir. Andy Wilson. Perf. Clive Owen, Maynard Eziashi, Christopher Fulford, Eve Bland and Burt Caesar. Television Film. BBC. 1994.

Female God and Other Forbidden Fruit. Radio play. BBC World Service, 1991.

Not Even God is Wise Enough. Dir. Danny Boyle. Perf. Kevin Allen, T R Bowen, Mona Hammond, George Harris, Paterson Joseph, Vivienne McKeone, Doyle Richmond, Mark Strong, Ben Thomas and Ellen Thomas. Television. BBC. 20 Oct. 1993.

 

Film Credits for Biyi Bandele

Adapt. Half of A Yellow Sun. By Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Dir. B Bandele. Perf. Thandie Newton, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Joseph Mawle, Anika Noni Rose, John Boyega, Hakeem Kae-Kazim, Genevieve Nnaji, Babou Ceesay, O C   Ukeje, Paul Hampshire, Susan Wokoma, Onyeka Onwenu, Zack Orji. British Film Institute (BFI). 2013.

The Kiss. Dir. B Bandele. Perf. Nabil Elouahabi, Rosie Fellner and Brahim Salek. Piper Films. 2006. <http://wn.com/biyi_bandele>.

 

Other Writings by Biyi Bandele

Black President: The Art and Legacy of Fela Anikulapo-Kuti. Ed. Trevor Schoonmaker. New York: New Museum of Contemporary Art, 2003.

Review of Goodbye Lucille by Segun Afolabi. The Guardian 5 May 2007, Review: 17.

‘Read Between the Signs’. The Guardian 26 Apr. 2003 <http://www.guardian.co.uk/stage/2003/apr/26/theatre.artsfeatures1>.

SW2: An Excerpt’. New England Review 19.3 (1998): 97-99.

Review of Who’s Afraid of Wole Soyinka?: Essays on Censorship by Adewale Maja-Pearce. Wasafiri 8.16 (1992): 68-69.

‘Welcome to Nollywood’. The Guardian 31 July 2007 <http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2007/jul/31/observerfilmmagazine.observerfilmmagazine5>.

 

Brixton Stories. Dir. Roxana Silbert. Perf. Jude Ajuwudike and Diane Parish. The Pit, Barbican Theatre, London. Rec. 18 Apr. 2001.

Marching for Fausa. Dir. Annie Castledine. Perf. Susan Aderin, Patrice Naiambana, Pamela Nomvete, Pauline Black, Leo Wringer, Femi Elufowoju and Jude Ajuwudike. Royal Court Theatre Upstairs, London. Rec. 27 Jan. 1993.

Adapt. Oroonoko by Aphra Behn. Dir. Gregory Doran. Perf. Nicholas Monu, Ewart James Walters, Ewen Cummings, Jo Martin, Nicky Reid, Kemi Baruwa, Michael Fenner, Nadine Marshall, Rod Arthur, David Collings, Geff Francis, David Oyelowo, Isreal Aduramo, Faz Shinghateh and Martin Slavin. Royal Shakespeare Company. The Pit, Barbican Theatre, London. Rec. 6 Jan. 2000.

Telani’s Graffiti. Perf. Bola Aiyeyala, Pauline Black, Patrice Naiambana, DeObia Oparei, Taiwo Payne and Leo Wringer. Royal Court Theatre Upstairs, London. Rec. 25 June 1992.

Thieves Like Us. Perf. Jude Akuwudike, Yemi Ajibade, Akim Mogaji, Joy Elais-Rilwan, Femi Elufowuju. Dir. Claire Grove. Rec. 1995.

Bandele, Biyi, Lucy Neal and Time Etchells. ‘Why do we play?’. Symposia 1-5. Roundhouse, London. Rec. 1 Nov. 2002.

 

Adcock, Hannah. ‘Characters Come of Age in Torrid Circumstances’. Edinburgh Festival Guide 23 Aug. 2007 <http://edinburghfestival.list.co.uk/article/4256-biyi-bandele/>.

Adesamni, Pius and Chris Dunton. ‘Introduction: Everything Good Is Raining: Provisional Notes on the Nigerian Novel of the Third Generation’. Research in African Litatures 39.2 (2008): VII-XII.

Afolayan, S and C Ibitoye. ‘A Marxist Interpretation of the Dystopian Society in the African Novel’. Critique: A Journal of Soviet Studies and Socialist Theory 39.3 (2011): 341-353.

Agho, Jude. ‘Scatology, Form and Meaning in the Novels of Alex La Guma and Biyi Bandele-Thomas’. Neohelicon 30.2 (2003): 195-2008.

Alfrey, Ellah. ‘Three Books On Entering Strange New Worlds’. Review of Burma Boy by Biyi Bandele. npr books. 17 Feb. 2011 <http://www.npr.org/2011/02/17/133464039/three-books-on-entering-strange-new-worlds>.

Al Jazeera. ‘Africa … States of Independence: Biyi Bandele, the Nigerian novelist and playwright gives insight into growing up in post-independence Nigeria’. Al Jazeera 5 Oct. 2010 <http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/africa-states- independence/2010/09/201091122217272959.html>.

Armistad, Claire. Review of Resurrections by Biyi Bandele. Talawa. Cochrane Theatre. The Guardian 10 Oct. 1994, Features: T7.

Bartholomew, Roy. ‘Homeless, but not rootless; Talawa remains Britain’s leading black theatre group, but since Yvonne Brewster moved out of the Cochrane Theatre citing “artistic differences”, it is a company without a home’. The Independent 1 Nov. 1995, Theatre: 10.

Benedict, David. ‘A miracle of stillness’. Review of Happy Birthday, Mister Deka D. by Biyi Bandele. Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh. The Independent 14 Aug. 1999, Features: 8.

—. ‘Missing in action: our black stares; The demise of minority theatre groups has narrowed the choice of roles for many actors to either hooker or pimp in The Bill, says David Benedict’. The Independent 1 Apr. 1998, Features: 14.

Billington, Michael. ‘Binoche but no dosh; Michael Billington on the year ahead’. The Guardian 6 Jan. 1999, Leader Page: 14.

—. ‘First Night: Lament for Man in a Changing World’. Review of Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe, adapt. Biyi Bandele. West Yorkshire Playhouse, Leeds. The Guardian 29 May 1997: 2.

—. ‘Life in a box: Black actors already play Shakespearean kings – now they’re taking on Noel Coward. But where are the new roles that reflect our world?’. The Guardian 4 Dec. 2002: 4.

—. Review of Marching to Fausa by Biyi Bandele. Royal Court Theatre Upstairs. The Guardian 15 Jan. 1993, Features: 8.

—. ‘Michael Billington saw 250 plays this year but few were willing to address contemporary issues’. The Guardian 29 Dec. 1999: 10.

—. Review of Senora Carrar’s Rifles by Bertolt Brecht, adapt. Biyi Bandele. The Guardian 26 Apr. 2007. Review: 38.

—. ‘Slave to passion’. Review of Oroonoko by Aphra Behn, adapt. Biyi Bandele. Royal Shakespeare Company. The Other Place, Stratford-upon-Avon. The Guardian 30 Apr. 1999, Leader Pages: 21.

Bouchard, Jen Westmoreland. ‘Representations of diasporic unbelonging: Surrealism in the work of Biyi Bandele-Thomas and Yinka Shonibare’. Migratatios & Identities 1.2 (2008): 99-114.

Bryce, Jane. ‘“Half and Half Children”: Third Generation Women Writers and the New Nigerian Novel’. Research in African Literatures 39.2 (2008): 49-67.

Cavendish, Dominic. ‘Oroonoko lives again; Biyi Bandele is writing a new play, has another on tour and his version of Aphra Behn’s history of the royal slave is in rehearsal at the RCS. Somehow he found time to talk to Dominic Cavendish’. The Independent 24 Mar. 1999, Features: 11.

Christopher, James. ‘A con to fall for’. Review of Thieves Like Us by Biyi Bandele. Southwark Playhouse, London. The Times 6 Oct. 1998, Features: np.

—. ‘A terrible beauty’. Review of Things Fall Apart, adapt. Biyi Bandele. West Yorkshire Playhouse, Leeds. The Times 30 May 1997, Features: np.

Cooper, Brenda. A New Generation of African Writers: Migration, Material Culture and Language. Woodbridge: James Currey, 2008.

Cooper, Neil. ‘Perky and quirky’. Review of Happy Birthday, Mister Deka D by Biyi Bandele. Told by an Idiot. Traverse Theatre. The Times 12 Aug. 1999, Features: np.

Bassett, Kate. ‘No longer left to blush unseen’. The Times 19 July 1994, Features: np.

Craig, Amanda. ‘Hardly Streetwise’. Review of The Street by Biyi Bandele. The Times 24 July 1999, Features: 33.

Cribb, T J. Review of Oroonoko and Happy Birthday, Mister Deka D by Biyi Bandele. Research in African Literatures 31.1 (2000): 173-178.

Daldry, Stephen. ‘Writing the Future: Stephen Daldry, the Royal Court’s artistic director, believes that after a decade under the cosh, new British playwrighting is back’. The Guardian 7 Sept. 1994, Features: T6.

De Peer, Stefanie Van. ‘A New Generation of African Writers: Migration, Material Culture and Language’. Modern Language Review 105.1 (2010): 236-238.

Diez-Tagarro, Rosa. ‘Interview with Biyi Bandele-Thomas’. Wasafiri 11.22 (1995): 57-59.

Drongoole, Dominic. ‘We’ve never had it so good’. The Guardian 10 Jan. 2001: 12.

Ellison, Mike. ‘Bad boyz have a ball as bullets fly and police peruse “aesthetic of violence” let lose on heath; Mike Ellison on a UK Film shooting to fame’. The Guardian 24 June 1994: 5.

Faber, George. ‘Right of Reply/Are you Listening, Dennis?; Whatever cynics say, television is giving a home to as many aspiring writers as ever, argues George Faber, the BBC’s head of single drama’. The Independent 13 Oct. 1994, Arts: 26.

Fasan, Rotimi Omoyele. ‘Mapping Nigerian Literature’. African Nebula 1 (2010): 34-43.

‘Festival with Czechs and balance’. Review of the 35th National Student Drama Festival. The Sunday Times 18 Mar. 1990, Features: np.

Flemming, Kate. Review of Oroonoko by Aphra Behn, adapt. Biyi Bandele. World Literature Today 74.3 (2000): 572.

Flemming, Michael and Ali Jaafar. ‘Focus dances to Fela biopic beat’. Variety 8 Dec. 2009: 1.

Foden, Giles. Review of Burma Boy by Biyi Bandele. The Guardian 2 June 2007, Review: 16.

Gardner, Lyn. Review of Death Catches the Hunter by Biyi Bandele. Battersea Arts Centre. The Guardian 18 Oct. 1995, Features: T9.

—. Review of Brixton Stories by Biyi Bandele. The Guardian 8 Sept. 2006, Review: 42.

—. Review of Thieves Like Us by Biyi Bandele. Southwark Playhouse, London. The Guardian 14 Oct. 1998, Features: 12.

—. ‘You couldn’t make it up’. Review of Happy Birthday, Mr Deka D by Biyi Bandele. The Guardian 12 Aug. 1999: A14.

—. ‘Working-class hero: “Vulgar” Scottish plays have never had much success in London. Lyn Gardner meets the man who would change that’. The Guardian 27 Feb. 2002, G2: 13.

Gibbs, James. Review of Bearing Witness: Readers, Writers, and the Novel in Nigeria by Wendy Griswold. World Literature Today 75.1 (2001): 98.

—. Review of The Sympathetic Undertaker and Other Dreams by Biyi Bandele. World Literature Today 68.2 (1994): 412.

Gibbs, Jonathan. Review of Burma Boy by Biyi Bandele. The Financial Times 16 June 2007, weekend magazine: 40.

Grylls, David. ‘Little fighting machines’. Review of Burma Boy by Biyi Bandele. The Sunday Times 22 July 2007, Features: 50.

Habila, Helon. ‘Is this the year of the Nigerian writer?’ Review of Edinburgh International Book Festival, Edinburgh. The Times 8 Aug. 2007, Features: 12.

Hains, Melanie. Review of The King’s Rifle. Examiner.com 17 May 2010 <http://www.examiner.com/canada-book-in-canada/review-of-the-king-s-rifle-by-biyi-bandele>.

Hemming, Sarah. ‘The Fringe: Rising from the ashes’. The Independent 3 Aug. 1994, Theatre: 21.

—. ‘The Unbelievable Truth: Biyi Bandele-Thomas wanted to write: being stabbed was just the spur’. The Independent 28 Sept. 1994, Theatre: 21.

Henry, Andrea. ‘Mixed company for the Lonely Londoners; Andrea Henry visits two sides of the black metropolis – the threatening estate, and the enchanting street; Society Within by Courttia Newland and The Street by Biyi Bandele’. The Independent 31 July 1999, Features: 11.

Hewison, Robert. ‘The play’s the thing to write’. The Sunday Times 30 July 1995, Features: 17.

—. ‘Rehearsing for the apocalypse: 34th Sunday Times National Student Drama Festival’. The Sunday Times 9 Apr. 1989: np.

Higgins, Martin. Review of The Street by Biyi Bandele. The Times 29 Apr. 2000, Features: np.

Isherwood, Charles. ‘Star-Crossed Lovers Caught in an Unenlightened Era’. Review of Oroonoko by Aphra Behn, adapt. Biyi Bandele. A New Theatre for a New Audience. The Duke, New York. The New York Times, 11 Feb. 2008, late ed.: E4.

Iwanisziw, Susan B. Oroonoko: Adaptations and Offshoots. Adlershot: Ashgate, 2006.

—. Troping Oroonoko from Behn to Bandele. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2004.

Jaggi, Maya. ‘Seminal Sam; Sam Selvon, that is. He may not be a household name, but he’s the father of Britain’s black literature’. The Guardian 22 June 1995, Features: T8.

Jeffries, Stuart. ‘Super Cool Blues’. Review of Bad Boy Blues by Biyi Bandele. BBC 2. The Guardian 3 June 1996, Features: 10.

Judah, Hettie. ‘The joy of specs’. Review of Happy Birthday, Mr Deka D by Biyi Bandele. Told by an Idiot. Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh. The Sunday Times 15 Aug. 1999, Features: 19.

Kanga, Firdaus. ‘A clash of cultures’. Review of The Man Who Came In From the Back of Beyond by Biyi Bandele. The Sunday Times 19 May 1991, Features: np.

Kingston, Jeremy. ‘Coruscating study in corruption’. Review of Resurrections by Biyi Bandele. Talawa. Cochrane Theatre, London. The Times 5 Oct. 1994, Features: 38.

—. ‘Every woman fights back’. Review of Two Horsemen by Biyi Bandele. The Gate, London. The Times 29 July 1994, Features: np.

—. Review of Happy Birthday, Mr. Deka D by Biyi Bandele. Told by an Idiot. The Lyric Studio, London. The Times 12 Nov. 1999, Features: np.

—. ‘Oroonoko flows again: Jeremy Kingston meets the writer who has adapted Aphra Behn’s 17th Century novel for the RSC’. The Times 27 Apr. 1999, Features: np.

Koenig, Rhoda. ‘Keeping up with the Joneses’. Review of Brixton Stories by Biyi Bandele. Tricycle Theatre, London. The Independent 24 Oct. 2001, Features: 11.

Lavender, Andy. ‘Unknown Africa comes to Britain’. The Times 4 Aug. 1995, Features: 31.

Lewis, Trevor. Review of Burma Boy by Biyi Bandele. The Sunday Times 8 June 2008, Features: 48.

Mahoney, Elizabeth. Review of Oroonoko, adapt. Biyi Bandele. The Guardian 16 Sept. 2002: 20.

Maiwada, Ahmed. ‘The ‘Dan Kama Dosage in Biyi Bandele’s Burma Boy’. Sentinel Nigeria 4 (2011) <http://sentinelnigeria.org/online/issue4/the-dan-kama-dosage-in-biyi-bandeles-burma-boy/>.

—. ‘Understanding Biyi Bandele’s Burma Boy’. Farafina 29 (2010) <http://farafinabooks.wordpress.com/2010/11/29/understanding-biyi-bandeles-burma-boy/>.

Macaulay, Alastair. ‘“Bouncers” at the Riverside’. Review of Two Horsemen by Biyi Bandele. Bush Theatre, London. The Financial Times 5 Nov. 1994, Arts: XIX.

—. ‘Too clever for its own good’. Review of Brixton Stories by Biyi Bandele. Tricycle Theatre, London. The Financial Times 23 Oct. 2001, Arts: 24.

McGee, Celia. ‘Slavery as Seen From the Other Side’. Review of Oroonoko by Aphra Behn, adapt. Biyi Bandele. New Theater for a New Audience. The Duke, New York. The New York Times 18 Feb. 2008, late ed.: AR6.

McNary, Dave. ‘Mawle rises for “Sun” gig’. Variety 15 May 2012: 3.

Mengestu, Dinaw. ‘Children of War: for years the West saw Africa as a distant “hell” of coups, refugees and revolutions. But its writers tell a different – and more disturbing – story’. New Statesman 18 June 2007: 60-61.

Mensah, Nana Yaa. ‘A light goes out for African writing: Nana Yaa Mensah on the end of a great and influential publishing adventure’. New Statesman 24 Feb. 2003: 55.

‘Moreover: Not to miss’. Review of Oroonoko by Aphra Behn, adapt. Biyi Bandele. The Other Place, Stratford-upon-Avon. The Economist 8 May 1991: 91-92.

Morris, Tom. ‘Opportunity knocks; London New Play Festival delivers a wealth of writing talent’. The Independent 20 July 1994, London Entertainment: 8.

Negash, Girma. ‘Art Invoked: A Mode of Understanding and Shaping the Political’. International Political Science Review 25.2 (2004): 185-201.

—. ‘Migrant Literature and Political Commitment: Puzzles and Parables in the Novels of Biyi Bandele-Thomas’. Journal of African Cultural Studies 12.1 (1999): 77-92.

Nightingale, Benedict. ‘African view of the noble savaged’. Review of Oroonoko, adapt. Biyi Bandele. Royal Shakespeare Company. The Pit, Barbican, London. The Times 22 Dec. 1999, Features: np.

—. ‘Beckett rides again in Africa’. Review of Two Horsemen by Biyi Bandele. The Times 3 Nov. 1994, features: np.

—. ‘The Big Brecht Fest’. Review of Senora Carrar’s Rifles by Bertolt Brecht, adapt. Biyi Bandele. Young Vic, London. The Times 26 Apr. 2007, Times2: 22.

—. Review of Brixton Stories by Biyi Bandele. Lyric Studio, London. The Times 8 Sept. 2006, Times2: 22.

—. ‘Packaging a cause to little effect’. Review of Marching to Fausa by Biyi Bandele. Royal Court Theatre Upstairs, London. The Times 14 Jan. 1993, features: 34.

—. ‘A prince among savage men’. Review of Oroonoko by Aphra Behn, adapt. Biyi Bandele. Royal Shakespeare Compnay. Stratford-upon-Avon. The Times 20 Apr. 1999, Features: np.

—. ‘A short night of the soul’. Review of Brixton Stories by Biyi Bandele. Tricycle Theatre, London. The Times 22 Oct. 2001, Features, np.

Okoye, Chukwuma. ‘The Deep Stirring of the Unhomely: African Diaspora in Biyi Bandele’s The Street. Research in African Literatures 39.2 (2008). 79-92.

Onyema, Henry Chukwuemeka, ‘The Rat’s Tale and Its Winding Ways: A Review of Biyi Bandele’s Burma Boy’. Reservebooks.com undated <http://www.reservebooks.com/reviews/burmaboy.html>.

—. ‘This is an Epic’. The News 3 May 1999: 47.

Owomoyela, Oyekan. The Columbia Guide to West African Literature in English Since 1945. New York: Columbia UP, 2008.

Oyedeji, Koye. ‘Interview: Biyi Bandele’. African Events. 18 Sept. 2007

<http://africanevents.iblog.co.za/2007/09/18/interview-biyi-bandele/>.

Peel, Michael. ‘Young writers leave their mark’. The Financial Times 12 July 2007: 10.

‘Rich spectacle and language’. Review of Oroonoko by Aphra Behn, adapt. Biyi Bandele. Royal Shakespeare Company. The Financial Times 30 Apr. 1999, Arts: 16.

Peter, John. ‘Brecht Fest’. Review of Senora Carrar’s Rifles, adapt. Biyi Bandele. Young Vic, London. The Sunday Times 29 Apr. 2007, Features: 18.

—. Review of Brixton Stories by Biyi Bandele. The Pit, London. The Sunday Times 22 Apr. 2001, Features: np.

—. ‘Rest of this week’s theatre’. Review of Oroonoko by Aphra Behn, adapt. Biyi Bandele. Royal Shakespeare Company. Swan, Stratford. The Sunday Times 2 May 1999, Features: 17.

—. ‘Rest of this week’s theatre’. Review of Death Catches the Hunter by Biyi Bandele. Battersea Arts Centre, London. The Sunday Times 15 Oct. 1995: np.

—. ‘Rest of this week’s theatre’. Review of Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe, adapt. Biyi Bandele. Royal Court, London. The Sunday Times 8 June 1997, Features: np.

Peter, John and Robert Hewison. ‘Theatre check’. Review of Two Horsemen by Biyi Bandele. Bush Theatre, London. The Sunday Times 6 Nov. 1994, Features: np.

Quayson, Ato. ‘Realism, Criticsm, and the disguises of both: A reading of Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart with an evaluation of the criticism relating to it’. Research in African Literatures 25:4 (1994): 117-136.

Reade, Simon. ‘There’s still plenty of life in more traditional theatre’. The Guardian 12 Jan. 2000: 15.

Reid, Katie. ‘Migration and Transformation in Recent African Literary Criticism’. Africa 82.2 (2012): 312-319.

Riding, Alan. ‘Taking African Creativity Onto Europe’s Cultural Stage’. The New York Times 4 Oct. 1995, late ed., sec. C: 13.

Rose, Hilary. ‘Young Guns of Brixton’. The Times 16 Feb. 2002, Features: np.

Rutherford, Malcolm. ‘Nigerian anger on the march’. Review of Marching for Fausa by Biyi Bandele. Royal Court Upstairs, London. The Financial Times 18 Jan. 1993, Arts: 9.

Sandhu, Sukhdev. Review of The Street by Biyi Bandele. The Times Literary Supplement 6 Aug. 1999: 23.

Scott, Anna. Review of Burma Boy by Biyi Bandele. The Guardian 14 June 2008, Review: 20.

Seamans, Kate Dunlop. Review of The King’s Rifle by Biyi Bandele. School Library Journal 55.8 (2009): 129.

Shrapnel, Norman. ‘Not so much dead, as living in Crouch End’. Review of The Sympathetic Undertaker and Other Dreams by Biyi Bandele. The Guardian 28 Nov. 1991: np.

Shuttleworth, Ian. Review of Resurrections by Biyi Bandele. The Financial Times 19 Oct. 1994, Arts: 21.

—. ‘Unappetising morsel of drama’. Review of Happy Birthday, Mister Deka D by Biyi Bandele. Told by an Idiot. Lyric Studio, Hammersmith, London. The Financial Times 15 Nov. 1999, Arts: 24.

Slaughter, J R, H Wylie and Bernth Lindfors. ‘Going Naked to the Market: Traumatic Narrative in Biyi Bandele-Thomas’s The Sympathetic Undertaker and Other Dreams’. Annual Selected Papers; African Literature Association; Multiculturalism and Hybridity in African Literatures 1998: 269-278.

Sneider, Jeff. ‘Boyego gets “Sun”, talks “Zero”’. Variety 29 Mar. 2012: 5.

Soyinka, Markin. ‘Markin Soyinka interviews Biyi Bandele’. Farafina 4 (2006): 15-36.

Swarns, Rachel. ‘The Red Clay and Sorry of Nigeria’. Review of Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe, adapt. Biyi Bandele. New Jersey Performing Arts Centre, New Jersey. The New York Times 14 Feb. 1999, late ed., sec. 2: 5.

Sweeting, Adam. ‘Let’s talk about it: Arthrob Defining a Nation’. Review of Arthrob with Biyi Bandele, Dave Barbe, James Flint, Ben Richards and Irving Welsh. Mint Club, Leeds. The Guardian 18 June 1999, Leader Pages: 18.

Taylor, Paul. ‘Cross-currents of darkness’. Review of Marching for Fausa by Biyi Bandele. Royal Court Theatre Upstairs, London. The Independent 16 Jan. 1993: np.

—. ‘A little black mischief’. Review of Oroonoko by Aphra Behn, adapt. Biyi Bandele. Royal Shakespeare Company. The Other Place, Stratford upon Avon. The Independent 30 Apr. 1999, Features: 10.

Thielman, Sam. Review of Oroonoko by Aphra Behn, adapt. Biyi Bandele. Variety 18 Feb. 2000: 39.

Thompson, Peter S. ‘Negritude and a new Africa: An update’. Research in African Literatures 33.4 (2002): 143-153.

‘Tosh to curl up to and enjoy’. Review of Oroonoko, adapt. Biyi Bandele. Royal Shakespeare Company. The Financial Times 5 Jan. 2000, Arts: 18.

Truss, Lynne. ‘What price sweets when a trip goes sour?’. Review of Bad Boy Blues by Biyi Bandele. BBC 2. The Times 3 June 1996, Features: 47.

Tunney, Tom. Review of The Man Who Came in from the Back of Beyond. New Internationalist Magazine 243 (May 1993) <http://www.newint.org/features/1993/05/05/reviews/>.

Wallace, Elizabeth Kowaleski. ‘Transnationalism and Performance in Biyi Bandele’s Oroonoko’. PMLA 119.2 (2004): 265-281.

Wallace, Naomi. ‘Strange Times’. The Guardian 29 Mar. 2003: 16.

Widmayer, Anne F. ‘The Politics of Adapting Behn’s Oroonoko’. Comparative Drama 37:2 (2003): 189-223.

Woodhall, James. ‘Fifty minutes of waiting is worthwhile’. Review of Happy Birthday, Mr Deka D by Biyi Bandele. Told by an Idiot. Schiller-Theater, Berlin. The Financial Times 27 Oct. 2000, USA ed.1, Arts: 17.

Wright, Derek. ‘Whither Nigerian Fiction? Into the Nineties’. Journal of Modern African Studies 3.2 (1995): 315-332.

Amber Lane Press Website. <http://www.jamber.plus.com/bandele_biyi.htm>.

BBC Website. ‘BBC Africa Beyond: Celebrating African Arts in the UK’. <http://bbc.preview.somethinelse.com/africabeyond/africanarts/19924.shtml>.

Biyi Bandele on Facebook. <http://www.facebook.com/pages/Biyi-Bandele/105660522801224>.

Biyi Bandele Wikipedia Entry. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biyi_Bandele>.

British Council Website. <http://literature.britishcouncil.org/biyi-bandele>.

Centre for Creative Arts, South Africa Website. <http://dbnweb2.ukzn.ac.za/cca/images/tow/TOW2011/bios/Bandele.html>.

Culturebase – The International Artist Database Website <http://www.culturebase.net/artist.php?3542>.

Edizioni Gorée Website. <http://www.edizionigoree.it/autore_biyi_bandele.php>.

Internationales Literaturfestival Berlin Website.

<http://www.literaturfestival.com/participants/authors/2003/biyi-bandele>.

The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) Website. <http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1209237/>.

The Literary Encyclopedia Website. <http://www.litencyc.com/php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=5872>.

Prague Writers’ Festival Website. <http://www.pwf.cz/archivy/autori/biyi-bandele/en/>.

Random House Website. <http://www.randomhouse.com.au/authors/biyi-bandele.aspx>.

The Complete Review – online database of reviews Website.           <http://www.complete-review.com/reviews/nigeria/bandele3.htm>.

WorldCat Identities Website. <http://www.worldcat.org/identities/lccn-nr92-31945>.